Itilba

ITIL BA

A growing number of IT services organizations are adopting a set of best practices known as ITIL. Successful ITIL implementation is contingent upon excellent communication with the customer, yet the person tasked with that responsibility, the Business Analyst, is often either untrained in ITIL, or unsure how to apply ITIL guidelines and concepts to an IT project. The result is a disconnect between ITIL theory and practice. The BA working in implementing ITIL must ensure that the provision of services is customer-focused, that services are described in customer language, and that the continuing quality of these services is well managed. To assist organizations in meeting these requirements BA Training Centre has developed a unique course that addresses this unique challenge

A practical guide to implementing ITIL Service Management best practices, with a focus on the Business Analyst’s role in the provisioning of customer-focused IT services.

Duration: 3 days

Description:

This session will explore the relationship between ITIL and the Business Analyst role. The course highlights the BA role in key ITIL Service Management processes. Trainees will learn to elicit and document features, business and user requirements as well as quality and other non-functional requirements and gain experience performing key BA tasks in an ITIL environment, including: facilitating requirements-gathering workshops, conducting interviews and creating requirements documentation at various points on a project – learning what types of questions to ask and artifacts to produce as the project progresses. The course tracks the BA role over the course of a project. The instructor performs each step with the class using a running example based on an ITIL Incident Management system, focusing on the links between Business Analysis and ITIL artifacts and processes such as Service Level Management and Change Management. Trainees follow-up by carrying out the same steps in group workshops, using a running case study. The workshop case study may be one of the group’s own choosing or one provided with the course materials.

Why:

A growing number of IT services organizations are adopting a set of best practices known as ITIL. Successful ITIL implementation is contingent upon excellent communication with the customer, yet the person tasked with that responsibility, the Business Analyst, is often either untrained in ITIL, or unsure how to apply ITIL guidelines and concepts to an IT project. The result is a disconnect between ITIL theory and practice. This course addresses the issue by providing practical guidance to the BA working in implementing ITIL and ensuring that the provisioning of services is customer-focused, that services are described in customer language, and that the continuing quality of these services is well-managed.

What makes this course stand out from the competition?

1. Practical implementation: There are many courses in the theory of ITIL; this course does more: it provides clear practical guidelines for ensuring that IT services are - and remain - customer-focused, as envisioned by ITIL.

2. Makes the connection between ITIL and the Business Analyst role. ITIL recognizes that whether or not IT services fulfill expectations depends primarily on how effectively the deliverables were agreed upon in dialogue with the customer rather than on how well the supplier provides the service. Moreover, continuing dialogue is required to refine the services over time. This course is unique in its recognition of the key role played by the BA – the person responsible for that dialogue - in the successful implementation of ITIL.

3. Take-home materials: Each trainee receives our popular Cheat Sheet, with checklists, tables that describe what questions to ask stakeholders, what artifacts to produce and what techniques to use at each phase of an IT project, glossaries of diagram symbols and valuable templates.

Audience:

• IT Business Analysts

• Project Managers

• ITIL implementers

• Systems Analysts and programmers interested in expanding their role into the business area.

• As well consideration should be given to the following roles and relationships.

Roles and their relationship to ITIL processes

Following is a summary of roles and some of the identified responsibilities, as identified by previous meetings with clients.

BA (IT/ non-IT/ Business-systems analyst): BA needs to assess and/or provide input directly towards the Configuration Management update plans for CI definitions and granularity; with Application Architect, consider to what extent Change Control needs are to be exercised.

· Application Architect:

· Project Manager: Impacts ADLC

· IT project manager: Impacts SDLC

· Configuration Manager: Ensure CI definition and degree of granularity supports desired level of change control

· Developers and architects: Consider application management, where to place/align error controls, and the type of error messages as these (errors, etc.) are triggers to the Service Desk on incidents - whether triggered through automated tools or users’ reports)

· Systems Analyst

· Infrastructure Technology Architect

· Config Mgmt roles: Administrator (approves CI changes); user (owns RFCs, submits drafts of changes to administrator, who approves them)

Prerequisites: Introduction to ITIL

Class Format:
The course content is presented through:

• an integrated case study based on a real-life system

• lectures

• one-on-one assistance during the workshop portion of the course

Typical Deliverables

Business Requirements constitute a specification of simply what the business wants. This is usually expressed in terms of broad outcomes the business requires, rather than the specific functions the system may perform. Specific design elements are usually outside the scope of this document, although design standards may be referenced.

Functional requirements describe what the system, process, or product/service must do in order to fulfill the business requirement(s). Note that the business requirement often can be broken up into sub-business requirements and many functional requirements. These are often referred to as System Requirements.

Non Functional Requirements are requirements that cannot be met by a specific function, e.g. performance, scalability, security and usability requirements. These are often included within the System Requirements, where applicable

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